Service Dog Training Program

Our Canine Development company provides a multi-level and intense service dog training program. Service dogs are challenged every day and put in stressful situations to help serve us and often times our lives.  Our high expectations from our service dog will mandate an intense amount of training and multiple levels of testing/certificates throughout the program.

Temperament is crucial in a service dog. Only about 20% of dogs contain the desired temperament needed for service work. A detailed temperament evaluation will be performed by All Stage Canine Development and must prove the dog fit for your needed service before moving forward.

 

women and girl with dog

Diabetic Alert Service Dog

Diabetic Alert Certification must be completed by both the dog and the client and prior completion of all the steps of a service dog training program before scent training can even begin. Blood sugar levels in a diabetic spike and drop into dangerous levels that can be life-threatening. In each of these situations, the body has a specific smell that a dog can sense. Through scent training and specific chain training, we can set a scent “safety window.” We will teach the dog to alert outside of that safe zone. This scent training is done with your specific scent samples so a sample kit will be provided to you by All Stage Canine Development. Once we have set your window of highs and lows, we will begin our training for your desired alerts paired with the target scents. The actual scent training doesn’t take long because the dogs have a quick memory of scents. The alert training, however, can take months when you add in cues or behaviors to be linked to those scents.

If you need additional assistance such as to get help or get juice, the training program may take longer as we are adding many chains of commands.

Blood sugar levels in a diabetic spike or drop can lead into dangerous numbers that can be life threatening.  In each a spike or drop, the body has a specific smell that a dog can easily detect. Through scent and chain training, we can set a scent “safety window” for the person with the disability.  We teach the dog to alert outside of that safe zone. The scent training is done with your specific scent samples. All Stage Canine Development will provide you with a kit and will educate on how to collect and use samples.  Once we have your set window of highs ad lows, we will begin our training for your desired alerts paired with the targeted numbers through samples.  

This type of service dog will have a few areas of focus.  First, they can alert and let the handler know their numbers are in or will potentially be in a danger zone.  Second, should the handler be in that danger zone, the dog can assist in getting any emergency medication or food.  Lastly the dog can go get help should the handler become unable to respond or even unconscious. 

A diabetic alert dog can be many types of breeds and sizes as long as they are able to perform tasks that are needed.  Most often the breed will need to have a longer nose as shorter noses are often not suitable for the job. The size of your dog and their nose may be a deciding factor on whether or not they are accepted into our program as it can limit their ability to perform needed tasks for the handler’s disability.

All service dog program with All Stage Canine Development begins with a detailed 2 hour consult with both the disabled person and their dog they wish to be trained.  We do three separate evaluations during this time. First, we determine if the dog is an actual fit for the program. Do they have any behavior issues or physical limitations that would prevent them from being a good service dog?  Does the dog have appropriate drives to perform the desired tasks for the disability? Second, we look at the person and their specific disability. Is the person mentally and physically able to work with the dog as we need them in order to practice the directions given for training to make this successful?  Lastly, we look at the relationship between the person and their dog. Do they seem to have a good bond and communication foundation between the two that will allow building new relationship challenges?

Any dog accepted into our service dog training program will start with obedience which is verified by an evaluation before moving forward.  After the obedience is verified, public access skills are worked on and also tested in two locations on two separate days. This will help us verify that the dog is solid in public, had the appropriate relationship with their handler, and does not pose a threat to the general public if placed in a concerning situation.  Following the obedience and public access verification, task work is then started with the handler based on their specific disability and needs.

Our goal is to help people train their own dogs to be a service dog at a reasonable cost.  We educate the importance of understand both their rights and responsibilities as a service dog owner. This program takes a lot of effort from the person to ensure its success.  For those who graduate the program, the bond between the handler and their service dog is unbreakable and we think that is AMAZING.

Therapy Service Dog

This is a detailed and multistep catered program that will prepare the client and the dog for the desired therapy work chosen. The training will take place in and out of the client’s home and will consist of work in advance obedience as well as public access and social behavior. A detailed temperament test is completed to first determine if you and your dog make a good fit for the program. Should All Stage Canine Development feel there could be a safety concern, we will not move forward with the training.  woman with black poodle

Once the program is completed, additional testing may be mandated by the company or organization you wish to do therapy work with. All Stage Canine Development will also prepare you for this if needed.

Training-The obedience training is part of the therapy dog program and will be advanced with both the dog and client. Verbal and hand commands/cues will be mandated as therapy dogs are in many different situations.

Public Access- Public access as a therapy dog can mean different things based on the area of “specialty” chosen such as children vs adults, or libraries vs hospitals. In each situation, there must be work on how your dog behaves in public to ensure your safety as well as everyone else around you.

Social Behavior- Social behavior as a therapy dog is much more complicated than you would think. The public, though unintentional, are very rude creatures to a dog. We greet them quickly, pet them rough, and sometimes accidentally step on their tail or drop things on them.

Allergen Service Dog

Having a severe allergy to peanuts can be life altering as well as life threatening.  A peanut detection (or another severe allergen) dog, similar to a diabetic alert dog is a medical alert dog using scent work.  A dog can detect peanuts not only alone but in a mixture of ingredients as well. Accidents can happen if there is no knowledge of someone having an extreme allergy.  

This type of service dog will have a few areas of focus.  First, they can alert and prevent exposure to the peanut. Second, should the handler be exposed, the dog can assist in getting any emergency medication, and lastly the dog can go get help should the handler become unconscious. 

A detection dog can be many types of breeds and sizes as long as they are able to perform tasks that are needed.  Most often the breed will need to have a longer nose as shorter noses are often not suitable for the job. The size of your dog and their nose may be a deciding factor on whether or not they are accepted into our program as it can limit their ability to perform needed tasks for the handler’s disability.

All service dog program with All Stage Canine Development begins with a detailed 2 hour consult with both the disabled person and their dog they wish to be trained.  We do three separate evaluations during this time. First, we determine if the dog is an actual fit for the program. Do they have any behavior issues or physical limitations that would prevent them from being a good service dog?  Does the dog have appropriate drives to perform the desired tasks for the disability? Second, we look at the person and their specific disability. Is the person mentally and physically able to work with the dog as we need them in order to practice the directions given for training to make this successful?  Lastly, we look at the relationship between the person and their dog. Do they seem to have a good bond and communication foundation between the two that will allow building new relationship challenges?

Any dog accepted into our service dog training program will start with obedience which is verified by an evaluation before moving forward.  After the obedience is verified, public access skills are worked on and also tested in two locations on two separate days. This will help us verify that the dog is solid in public, had the appropriate relationship with their handler, and does not pose a threat to the general public if placed in a concerning situation.  Following the obedience and public access verification, task work is then started with the handler based on their specific disability and needs.

Our goal is to help people train their own dogs to be a service dog at a reasonable cost.  We educate the importance of understand both their rights and responsibilities as a service dog owner. This program takes a lot of effort from the person to ensure its success.  For those who graduate the program, the bond between the handler and their service dog is unbreakable and we think that is AMAZING.

Psychiatric Service Dog

Psychiatric Service dogs are trained for many different disabilities such as PTSD, autism, and other extreme anxiety or mental related concerns.  These disabilities can be life altering and debilitating. 

A service dog can help a person with such issues live a life of certain normalcy by performing tasks to help keep a person safe and as mentally stable as possible. For example, a person with extreme PTSD may not even be able to visit a grocery store as a result from mania or extreme panic attacks as there are many triggers in public.  PTSD may be due to something a person was born with, or may be caused by a traumatic event. In any situation, a trained service dog can be taught how to recognize indicators, alert before an episode, and assist during or after an episode.

A person may have constant triggers which means there will be high stress leading to an episode each time they are exposed.  A service dog can be trained to recognized and prevent many of those triggers to help for a calmer exposure in public. For example, a dog can block a person from being approached by others or a person can be lead away from groups of people.  If there are specific characteristics of a person or place that can be pinpointed, a dog can also prevent their handler from even being exposed. 

Before a person has an episode (major or minor), there are usually many indicators given by the person that will lead them up to their symptoms.  This may be as simple as a leg twitch or heavy breathing. Often times if the dog can perform an alerting behavior during these minor indicators, it can prevent a potential episode as it will notify the person of their increased agitated state and they can take any measures needed to change the situation.

If a recognized indicator is not realistic or even an option, this can result in an increased agitation state such as hyperventilating or self-mutilation.  When a person is in this state, the service dog may perform tasks to help calm, focus, and stay safe.

After an episode, most often a person can be tired, unaware, or even unconscious.  A dog can be trained to stay and task or leave for help, depending on the situation.

Most often psychiatric service dogs are a medium to large breed dog as they are performing tasks that may take physical strength.  There are fewer smaller dogs in this role, however not impossible to make happen. The size of your dog will be a deciding factor on whether or not they are accepted into our program as it can limit their ability to perform needed tasks for the handler’s disability.

All service dog program with All Stage Canine Development begins with a detailed 2 hour consult with both the disabled person and their dog they wish to be trained.  We do three separate evaluations during this time. First, we determine if the dog is an actual fit for the program. Do they have any behavior issues or physical limitations that would prevent them from being a good service dog?  Does the dog have appropriate drives to perform the desired tasks for the disability? Second, we look at the person and their specific disability. Is the person mentally and physically able to work with the dog as we need them in order to practice the directions given for training to make this successful?  Lastly, we look at the relationship between the person and their dog. Do they seem to have a good bond and communication foundation between the two that will allow building new relationship challenges?

Any dog accepted into our service dog training program will start with obedience which is verified by an evaluation before moving forward.  After the obedience is verified, public access skills are worked on and also tested in two locations on two separate days. This will help us verify that the dog is solid in public, had the appropriate relationship with their handler, and does not pose a threat to the general public if placed in a concerning situation.  Following the obedience and public access verification, task work is then started with the handler based on their specific disability and needs.

Our goal is to help people train their own dogs to be a service dog at a reasonable cost.  We educate the importance of understand both their rights and responsibilities as a service dog owner. This program takes a lot of effort from the person to ensure its success.  For those who graduate the program, the bond between the handler and their service dog is unbreakable and we think that is AMAZING.

Physical Assistance Service Dog

A physical assistance service dog can help with many different physical disabilities including hearing, visual impairment, and not being able to get up or move an item.

There are many tasks that can be performed by a dog that can allow a handler more freedom to do things by themselves such as grocery shopping or even the act of being able to go in public.  A physical assistance dog can help prevent both medical limitations and accidents.

Medical limitations that a dog may be able to help with could include picking up and retrieving items, stability for getting up and down or walking, alerting for medications, and much more!  There are also tasks that can help improve safety measures such as breaking or assisting falls or seizures and going for help.

Most often physical assistance dogs are a medium to large breed dog as they are performing tasks that may take physical strength.  The size of your dog will be a deciding factor on weather or not they are accepted into our program as it can limit their ability to perform needed tasks for the handler’s disability.

All service dog program with All Stage Canine Development begins with a detailed 2 hour consult with both the disabled person and their dog they wish to be trained.  We do three separate evaluations during this time. First, we determine if the dog is an actual fit for the program. Do they have any behavior issues or physical limitations that would prevent them from being a good service dog?  Does the dog have appropriate drives to perform the desired tasks for the disability? Second, we look at the person and their specific disability. Is the person mentally and physically able to work with the dog as we need them in order to practice the directions given for training to make this successful?  Lastly, we look at the relationship between the person and their dog. Do they seem to have a good bond and communication foundation between the two that will allow building new relationship challenges?

Any dog accepted into our service dog training program will start with obedience which is verified by an evaluation before moving forward.  After the obedience is verified, public access skills are worked on and also tested in two locations on two separate days. This will help us verify that the dog is solid in public, had the appropriate relationship with their handler, and does not pose a threat to the general public if placed in a concerning situation.  Following the obedience and public access verification, task work is then started with the handler based on their specific disability and needs.

Our goal is to help people train their own dogs to be a service dog at a reasonable cost.  We educate the importance of understand both their rights and responsibilities as a service dog owner. This program takes a lot of effort from the person to ensure its success.  For those who graduate the program, the bond between the handler and their service dog is unbreakable and we think that is AMAZING.

Temperament

Once the right temperament has been determined, an advanced obedience training and desensitizing program is developed and implemented with you and your future service dog. The obedience training for this program will be in depth and intense for both your dog and you. Verbal and hand commands/cues will be mandated and used as service dogs are consistently in very different and sometimes very extreme situations. The training prepares the dog and the client for real life situations. An obedience test and certification will be mandated in order to move forward in the program.

No matter which service your dog will be performing, public access training is a must. Many training sessions will be scheduled to prepare for the public work as a service dog. Safety is our first goal for you, your dog, and the public. A detailed public access test and certification must be complete in order to move forward with the service dog program.

Social behavior from a service dog is much different than a therapy dog. A service dog cannot solicit attention from others as they have a job and handler to focus on. It is crucial that the dogs focus does not get pulled from their handler as it could prove to be a safety hazard. Despite vests, harnesses, or patches asking the public not to pet the dog, many often do not read or ask before greeting your dog.

Due to this unfortunate fact, a service dog must complete the same social behavior and desensitizing training as a therapy dog. A service dog can never show fear or aggression towards people or situations. Once the temperament, obedience, public access, and social behaviors are set, actual service training can be started.

Class Overview

Our Canine Trainers will not perform training without the presence of the handler. The training program isn’t just for your dog, it is to teach you how to be the handler which can prove to be just as challenging as the training for your service dog. This program requires hard work and dedication from you as the handler in training in order for it to be successful. All Stage Canine Development will be available consistently by phone in between lessons to address any questions.

All Stage Canine Development will also not push a dog through the program if there are any potential safety concerns, even if they may have the behaviors needed for the service work. Each step and certification in the program does not guarantee your dog will finish the program. If there are safety issues, All Stage Canine Development will discontinue moving forward with the training.

 

Please don’t wait ask your questions or voice your concerns as they arise during the training. Sometimes waiting even a week can prolong your training program months.Based on the needs of the disability, All Stage Canine Development will develop a detailed program to assist your specific needs. Each disability is different which can result in different program time frames.

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Julie E.'s Review Julie E.
5.0 star rating

I adopted a dog from a local shelter and he was quite a handful! He nick named him "Hurricane Milo" I tried another local trainer first and was so stressed...

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Abby E.'s Review Abby E.
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I love All Stage! All the trainers there are so wonderful and understanding. They have helped and continue to help us train our service dog. They have...

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Vonda R.'s Review Vonda R.
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Update: Chizuko just completed her 1st 6 week basic training program with Alex. She loved the classes and graduated with the rest of her peers. Alex made...

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All Stage Canine Development
4.9
Based on 13 reviews
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A Ross
A Ross
18:19 06 Mar 20
Go to for the new pup! Amazing trainers that are patient and experienced. Very welcoming environment, easy process and... super affordable. Wide variety of classes. 🙂read more
Katy O'Donnell
Katy O'Donnell
04:38 12 Nov 19
Wonderful trainers! We have worked with 3 of the trainers here and have had nothing but a positive experience. They... helped us with basic obedience for my first dog - mostly teaching me how to communicate with my dog. Then when i adopted a second dog they helped me get a handle in how to deal with excessive barking. Basically: i can't say enough about the trainers here. They're wonderful - compassionate and knowledgeable folks. Would highly recommend them to anyone.read more
Andrew Neskirded
Andrew Neskirded
18:37 16 Sep 19
Got a new black lab puppy a few months ago. Wanting her to be well behaved I have taken her to three different... training/obedience venues. I enjoyed the six week program and recommend All Stage Canine Development and my puppy has done well.read more
Jack MeHoff
Jack MeHoff
08:46 07 Sep 19
This is the place to get your canine friend trained.
Cassie Cruz
Cassie Cruz
03:48 21 Jun 19
Absolutely love all stage canine development they have helped us create the most amazing border collie. She loves all... stage we love all stage all around it helped us create an ultimate family living experience. Our pup started at all stage at 9-10 weeks old and we haven’t stopped training and not because she didn’t get it the first time but because we had no idea how far we could go with training we now have a border collie who turns one year old tomorrow who is absolutely amazing. She is good canine certified and we decided to keep going with our training because all stage has taught us so much and has helped us create an amazing pup. We have recommended them to everyone we know and will continue to do so. Their entire team is phenomenal!!!!!! We have a dog excited about life and has created a bond with everyone at all stage!!!!read more
Ron Carroll
Ron Carroll
22:37 18 Jun 19
Marshall Lomolino
Marshall Lomolino
03:58 26 Apr 19
Very knowledgeable and helpful staff and had a great experience here. Nick has been showing much more confidence and... calmness since working with these guys!read more
cloud nine
cloud nine
01:02 27 Mar 19
Nicky Knuckles
Nicky Knuckles
09:35 29 Dec 18
Super friendly, super easy going, and extraordinarily accommodating. An extremely rare customer experience. One that I... wish would spread throughout.read more
Alex Miele
Alex Miele
15:32 22 Aug 18
Professional dog training with purpose.
Tara Alcione
Tara Alcione
00:13 08 May 18
All of the trainers are great! I've taken my dog to both group classes and individual training classes and have... experienced great success with my rescue. The trainers have experience with all dog types and put me at ease with my pitbull rescue. Highly recommend. The group classes included basic training and agility type courses.read more
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